The MacBitseach

I am The MacBitseach of Clan MacBitseach. (MacBitseach is Irish Gaelic for son of a bitch.)
This blog is about wearing, making, and some of the social aspects of kilts. I started wearing and making kilts in 2003.
If you have any questions, comments, or ideas, email me at macbitseach@gmail.com

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Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada

Tuesday, June 28, 2005

Cool Old Couple

I'm standing at a red light, waiting for green. I'm wearing a MacBitseach Grizzly Cut kilt, black fleece jacket, runners and white socks pushed down.
An elderly couple crossing the other way notices my kilt and stops.
"Well, you look great!" he says.
"I'm not very dressy today." I shrugged.
"You get dressy for the Queen and she's not here. My brother was in the Black Watch in WWII. He wore his kilt home and my mother called it a skirt. Well sir, he almost killed her!" He smiled, remembering.
Then the light changed and we said a quick goodbye. I looked back at them from across the street and he gave me one of those Burt Lancaster waves.
There's just not enough time to stop and talk to all the people you'd like to talk to.

Monday, June 27, 2005

Natural Born Kilters

A guy and his gal walk up to the Bear Kilts booth at the BC Scottish Highland Games. Good looking couple. I'd seen the guy standing in the beer tent a while ago and was struck by the way he stood in his kilt. He had his weight on one leg, hands on hips, like a portrait of a clan chief. He had sort of a Ewan MacGregor ease about him.
He was wearing a cheesecloth, collarless, kilt shirt; the lace up kind, and a kilt, sporran, etc.
When he got to the booth I asked him, "You wear your kilt more than a couple of times a year for special occasions, don't you?"
"Aye, I do." he answered with an authentic Scottish brogue. "I wear it a few times a week."
"I could actually tell you did by the way you walk in it. You don't seem self conscious, or walking like you're trying to look good in your kilt. You just seem very natural in it."
We talked about kilts for a while and he went on his way but seeing him was one of the highlights of the games for me. People who have seen me while driving by have told me I look natural walking down the street in my kilt.
This guy looked more natural than all the other guys in kilts at the games.
There's a point when wearing a kilt becomes a non-event for the wearer, when courage isn't needed because you've worn it so much.
You've realised that it isn't wearing the kilt that makes you special, it's being special that allows you to wear the kilt.
I can spot those rare guys in a field full of kilted guys.
And they smile a lot.

Friday, June 24, 2005

BC Highland Games

Bear Kilts and Celtic Empire will have a booth at the BC Scottish Highland Games again. It is this Saturday, so if you can make it, come out and see Rudi, Cub, and I at the booth.

Also, coming soon ... a wicked new design for a kilt! I don't want to give away too much but I am very excited about it! This is something unique and may take the kilt, as we know it, to a new level.

Sound like hyperbole? It ain't.

Tuesday, June 14, 2005

Have a seat. Aaaaagh!

I often hear or read women's comments about why men shouldn't wear kilts until they learn how to sit properly, with their knees together, like women have learned to do in their skirts.

This is typical of a growing number of silly people that consider men and women not only equal, but the same.

What they seem to have not noticed, is that men's and women's bodies are built differently. It is uncomfortable, often impossible for men to sit with their knees together, whether wearing a kilt or a pair of pants. We have things that get in the way.

What these women are saying is they don't want men being provocative. They don't want men looking sexy. They don't want their men looking good to other women. They are shallow, scared women that try to keep their men in a state that would allow these men to sit comfortably with their knees together.
They don't want their men acting like men.

Those of us with balls sit as we please, as is comfortable, like men.

Monday, June 06, 2005

I'm crushing your head!

Look at a distant guy between your thumb and forefinger, while saying, "I'm crushing your head!"
While it may be healthy to get rid of some negative emotions, the person's head will remain disappointingly uncrushed.

Now listen to a bunch of guys on a kilt forums, blogs, etc. They will tell you to the best of their ability how comfortable it is to wear a kilt, how refreshing and invigorating the breeze is, how it feels to have women ogle you.
While it is smart to get opinions before jumping into something new, you will not know how it feels to wear a kilt until you give it a try.

You won't know how friggin' naturally good it feels to walk over a high bridge on a windy day.

At first wearing a kilt feels like you're naked to the world, especially on a cold day. Your boys just ain't used to breathing fresh air.
Over the next few weeks you will notice all kinds of health aspects you never imagined you suffered from. You will notice them only in their absence.
More talk.

Look at some distant pants wearing guy's mid-section between your thumb and forefinger, while saying, "I'm crushing your boys!"
Wait ... never mind; they're already being crushed.

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